The Simple Two-Part Solution to Poverty: Universal Basic Income and LVT

http://earthsharing.org/2016/06/13180/

Imagine a society in which each citizen is guaranteed a minimum monthly income. People do not work to survive; they instead work to contribute to their country, supplement their income, and enrich their minds and bodies. Poverty rates have plummeted, and socioeconomic divides across an entire populace have shrunk. It may sound like a socialist utopia, but a number of countries are considering the idea of a Universal Basic Income (UBI), with some poised to implement it in 2016. UBI has existed as a concept for hundreds of years. The idea was first posited by Johannes Ludovicus Vives in the 14th century and evolved via the work of Enlightenment figures like Thomas Paine and then, in the 19th and 20th centuries, by Western economists and politicians . The idea even surfaced in the 1972 United States presidential campaign in the form of a negative income tax, with both candidates expressing some form of support. The concept of a UBI has found support across the political spectrum. The Cato Institute, an American Libertarian think tank, has proposed that a UBI could be the better way for governments to redistribute income versus complex entitlement programs. Andy Stern, former president of one of the largest unions in America, the Service Employees International Union, believes a UBI is an effective way to target poverty at its core – a lack of income. Child Living in Smokey Mountain Dump, Manila Philippines via photopin (license) Centuries of hypothesizing notwithstanding, there have been few concerted efforts to implement a UBI until now. Y Combinator, a Silicon Valley-based company that provides seed money to startup companies, will be giving 100 families in Oakland between $1,000 and $2,000 per month for up to one year. Researchers will measure “happiness, well-being, financial health, as well as how people spend their time.” Finland is currently drafting a proposal for a UBI that would give each citizen 800 euros per month, and the Labour Party in the United Kingdom is considering backing a similar initiative. Some economists warn that a UBI would be ineffective if not paired with other policy changes. A potential downfall of UBI is that the greater income of citizens would be captured by landlords via rising rents. Therefore, efforts must be taken to ensure that rents do not absorb government-supplemented income. bbb low-cost housing, tegnestuen vandkunsten via photopin (license) The addition of a Land Value Tax (LVT) to funding the UBI would limit, if not eliminate, the amount of income absorbed by rents while providing the necessary revenue stream to support it. Martin Farley, author of the “Transformation Deal,” has calculated that this approach would create a revenue stream to support at least a moderate UBI. Furthermore, since the burden of an LVT is on landlords, excessive rents captured by them would be recouped by the LVT and re-injected into the UBI program. In addition, LVT has been shown to promote the best use of land, generating more lower-cost yet high-quality residential and commercial space, a further benefit of UBI. It has been argued by many that the dual combination of LVT and UBI would work extremely well together to resolve a number inequities in any economy. Economists from across the political spectrum will be watching Y Combinator, Finland, and other test programs closely as they experiment with a UBI. Success could mean an entirely new approach to the welfare state. Most important will be whether and how socioeconomic conditions change. And from those changes, new understandings may well arise to support ideas such as Land Value Taxation. For now, the world is watching. Cover image: Money! via photopin (license) The post The Simple Two-Part Solution to Poverty: Universal Basic Income and LVT appeared first on earthsharing.org.

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